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August 28 ~ Society of the Cincinnati to Present “Washington and Hamilton: The Great Collaboration”

Tue., Aug. 28 (6pm): In this free, 45-minute lecture Stephen Knott, professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College, will examine the most important collaboration in American history — the unlikely alliance between a wealthy Virginia planter and a brash immigrant from the Caribbean who went on to establish a “new order for the ages.” George Washington and Alexander Hamilton fought for the better part of 25 years to secure the American experiment in the face of bitter partisan opposition at home and determined enemies abroad. What makes Washington and Hamilton unique from other founding collaborations is that their bond was forged in the crucible of the Revolutionary War. This collaboration was vital to winning that war, adopting the Constitution, and creating the institutions necessary to secure liberty at home and respect abroad.

The unlikely partnership of George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, and the brief Federalist moment they presided over, allowed the United States to build the institutions that launched the nation on a path to becoming a superpower. If George Washington was the “indispensable man” of the American founding, then Washington and Hamilton’s collaboration was the “indispensable alliance” that determined the outcome of the creation of the United States of America.

The lecture will last 45 minutes followed by time for questions.

photo--Jon Black (2012).

photo–Jon Black (2012).

Visiting Anderson House provides a glimpse back into the history and splendor of Gilded Age Washington. This mansion was the winter home of Ambassador Plenipotentiary to Japan Larz Anderson III and his wife, Isabel, who hosted grand galas and intimate dinner parties for the high society of Washington for more than 30 social seasons. The Beaux Arts mansion directly across Massachusetts Avenue from the Cosmos Club features the Andersons’ collection of fine and decorative arts and is adorned with symbols of the family’s patriotism and pastimes. It offers a unique glimpse into political and private life in early 20th century Washington. The museum is open at no charge Tue.-Sat., 10am-4pm & Sun, noon-4pm. For more info, call 785-2040.